Photography

My early years were documented with a Vivitar 110, a modest camera with built-in flash and stylish wrist-strap. Later, my dad gave me his father’s Nikon S-2, a 35mm rangefinder introduced in 1954 with a 50mm f/1.4 lens. With it, I calculated proper exposure without the aid of a light meter and did experiments with depth of field. 50mm lenses are great for portraits, and I found myself getting closer and closer to the subjects of my photographs. I’ve used a Kiev-made rangefinder in recent years for similar purposes.

Lately—well, for perhaps the past 13-14 years—I’ve been shooting with a twin lens reflex (TLR) camera. I take it with me nearly everywhere.

I use photography to document my life. As a result, the subject matter varies widely: from toddlers and grandparents to interiors and botanicals. I take advantage of available light in order to depict these subjects as I’ve found them, and aim to represent a moment, event, or place through multiple details (not unlike the Cubist’s notion of depicting multiple viewpoints to represent the subject in a greater context).

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Kiplinger’s November issue is now on newsstands (and atop our dining room table, too). The magazine includes new photo-illustrations I created for the story Six Home Projects That Save Energy (and Money).

Kiplinger’s Personal Finance magazine was founded in 1947 and has a paid monthly circulation of 800,000. The monthly advises its readers on managing their money—covering investing, retirement planning, taxes, insurance, real estate, buying and leasing a car, health care, travel and financing college.

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Last week’s experiment with hair clippers, Sumi ink, and 120mm film.

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Gap’s Remix Project collection launches Friday, 5/29 online and in select stores. I’m thrilled to be included with such a talented group of artists. From Vogue Magazine:

EVERYONE loves a classic Gap T-shirt, and now there are more reasons to covet one. For its latest collaboration, the American retailer has created The Remix Project that sees it team with a series of emerging artists to create an exclusive collection of limited-edition prints.

They have attracted some of the brightest emerging names on the international art scene, including: Fantasista Utamaro and Yuka Choco Moo from Tokyo; Lin Zhipeng from Beijing; Candy Bird from Taipei; Loïc Lavenu and Maud Vantours from Paris; Kyle Pierce and Jessica Hische from San Francisco; POSE from Chicago; and Neville Brody and Quentin Jones from London.

 

My design for the REMIX project was inspired by San Francisco, the city I’ve called home for the past 18 years—and where Gap was founded in 1969. It presents the Golden Gate Bridge within a contour of the city; letterforms recreate the fog that so frequently graces the Gate.

 

Get to know a little more about me and my process in the video above. The video below includes all eleven artists and serves to introduce the project.

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K12I-ONLINE-BROKERS

The December 2014 issue of Kiplinger’s Magazine features my full-spread photo illustration for the article “Best of the Online Brokers”. The survey of ten leading online brokerages included ETrade, Firstrade, Merrill Edge, Schwab, Scottrade, TD America, TradeKing, tradeMONSTER, TradeStation, and Fidelity—who has since opted to reprint and distribute the article at its branch locations nationwide.

The illustration served as a section opener for “Investing” in the monthly magazine’s issue dedicated to “The Best List” (Kiplinger’s picks for everything from phone plan and ride-sharing service to wireless audio and place to retire). The collage of hand drawn elements include a charting of the S&P 500 and ink and watercolor renditions of app icons.

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NewSlowCity-cover

Advance copies of William Power’s book New Slow City arrived last week ahead of today’s official release. I designed the cover of Power’s memoir, including the photo-illustration and hand lettering, and created 11 illustrations for interior pages. New Slow City was published by New World Library in November, 2014.

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About the Book
Burned-out after years of doing development work around the world, William Powers spent a season in a 12-foot-by-12-foot cabin off the grid in North Carolina, as recounted in his award-winning memoir Twelve by Twelve. Could he live a similarly minimalist life in the heart of New York City? To find out, Powers and his wife jettisoned 80 percent of their stuff, left their 2,000-square-foot Queens townhouse, and moved into a 350-square-foot “micro-apartment” in Greenwich Village. Downshifting to a two-day workweek, Powers explores the viability of Slow Food and Slow Money, technology fasts and urban sanctuaries. Discovering a colorful cast of New Yorkers attempting to resist the culture of Total Work, Powers offers an inspiring exploration for anyone trying to make urban life more people—and planet—friendly.

About the Author
William Powers has worked for two decades in development aid and conservation in Latin America, Africa, and North America. From 2002 to 2004 he managed the community components of a project in the Bolivian Amazon that won a 2003 prize for environmental innovation from Harvard’s John F. Kennedy School of Government. His essays and commentaries on global issues have appeared in the New York Times and the International Herald Tribune and on National Public Radio’s Fresh Air. Powers has worked at the World Bank and holds international relations degrees from Brown and Georgetown. A third-generation New Yorker, Powers has also spent two decades exploring the American culture of speed and its alternatives in some fifty countries around the world. He has covered the subject in his four books and written about it in the Washington Post and the Atlantic. Powers is a senior fellow at the World Policy Institute and an adjunct faculty member at New York University.

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You will find hidden treasures where least expected is the seventh in a series featuring found fortune cookie text. Photographs were taken in Mammoth Lakes, California, in 2014. Find the rest of the series here.

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Kiplinger’s April issue includes seventeen of my photographs with the story “The Upside of Downsizing.” I had the pleasure of meeting two of the profiled couples at their new homes.

Patty and Mike Denevi’s new condominium in downtown Los Gatos, CA (50 miles south of San Francisco):

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Peggy and Mike Santella built a new home in Sun City, Mesquite, an active adult community located 80 miles east of Las Vegas, NV:

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NewSlowCity_cover

I was excited to find New Slow City available for pre-order on Amazon yesterday. Authored by William Powers, the 288-page book will be published by New World Library in November. In the meantime, you’ll find me working on the interior illustrations beginning next week. Take a look at the book’s summary and Powers’ bio below—this promises to be good.

Summary of New Slow City:
Burnt out after years of doing development and conservation work around the world, William Powers spent a season in a 12-foot by 12-foot cabin off the grid in North Carolina. Could he live a similarly minimalist way in the belly of the go-go beast — New York City? To find out, Powers and his wife jettisoned 80 percent of their stuff, left their 2,000-square-foot Queens townhouse, and moved into a 350-square-foot micro apartment in Greenwich Village. Downshifting to a 20-hour work week, Powers explores the viability of Slow Food and Slow Money, technology fasts and urban sanctuaries, rooftop gardening and beekeeping, and Glassphemy! recycling. Discovering a colorful cast of New Yorkers attempting to resist the culture of Total Work, Powers offers practical inspiration to anyone trying to make urban life more people- and planet-friendly.

About the Author:
Born and raised on Long Island, William Powers has worked for over a decade in development aid and conservation in Latin America, Africa, Washington, D.C., and Native North America. From 2002 to 2004 he managed the community components of a project in the Bolivian Amazon that won a 2003 prize for environmental innovation from Harvard’s John F. Kennedy School of Government. His writings on global issues have appeared in the New York Times, the Washington Post, the Atlantic, Slate, and the Sun. Mr. Powers has worked at the World Bank, and holds international relations degrees from Brown University and Georgetown’s School of Foreign Service. He is the author of the Liberia memoir Blue Clay People, the Bolivian memoir Whispering in the Giant’s Ear and the memoir of living “off-the-grid” in a twelve-foot-square cabin Twelve by Twelve: A One-Room Cabin Off the Grid & Beyond the American Dream. He is currently based part-time in New York City, and is freelance writer, speaker, and senior fellow at the World Policy Institute.

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Lost-Found-Hero

There’s a fine line between “lost” and “litter”. As the finder, who are we to judge? My series of Lost & Found flyers are up on The Bold Italic today. “Found” items were photographed at a number of locations within the northwest corner of San Francisco including The Great Highway, Inspiration Point (Presidio), Mountain Lake Park, and the Academy of Sciences and Music Concourse in Golden Gate Park.

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I had the recent pleasure of photographing the inner workings of Elixir, a brand identity firm based in San Francisco. Some of the photos now populate Elixir’s redesigned website; others can be seen below. (Note: Many of the photographs on Elixir’s site were taken by the inimitable John Dolan.)

It was nice to spend time with old friends and colleagues (and even celebrate a birthday!). Having managed Elixir’s day-to-day operations for 14 years (’97-’10), this team is invariably both. If you’d prefer to see the team baking cookies(!), click here.

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